Book Review: The Slow Regard for Silent Things by Patrick Rothfuss

Book Review: The Slow Regard for Silent Things by Patrick Rothfuss

The Slow Regard of Silent Things by Patrick Rothfuss ~ book review at Compulsively Quirky

Patrick Rothfuss presents his Ultimate OCD Guide to Introverting.

Or A Glimpse into Auri’s Life in the Underthing.

I spent a week with Auri. She finds things. She kisses things. She rearranges things. She keeps rearranging things. At one point, she makes soap.

There’s no dialogue.

There’s no conflict.

Now Rothfuss warns me at the beginning that this novella may not be for everyone. And if you have not read The Name of the Wind, then you definitely do not want to start with Auri’s story. Agreed.

As a fan of The Kingkiller Chronicles, I like to soak up every story and plot point possible within this world. And there were a few “ohh” moments of revelation, or what I interpreted as interesting revelations in this story. These tidbits make me glad that I read this novella.

Another positive? Rothfuss knows how to craft sentences. Many of his sentences within this story are fairly simple. Something I had not noticed in his novels. Emulating Auri’s thinking? Maybe. I think if I were alone all the time, my thoughts might become more concise.

While this story gives great insight into Auri’s comings and goings, and her thinking process, nothing really happens here. Hence my three stars “meh” reaction.

I did listen to the audiobook read by Rothfuss. For me, this decision kept me listening. I’m not sure I would have been able to keep reading words about Auri’s decorating issues without drifting, but hearing the story kept me more engaged.

I did look at the illustrations after listening to the audiobook. They’re beautiful. I love the final picture of Auri in the moonlight sitting on the rooftop.

What bothered me the most, though, was Rothfuss’ Author’s Endnote. He explains a bit more about this story’s development. Cool. And then he psychoanalyzes the audience he was writing to. Apparently, I’m not broken enough to thoroughly enjoy his story about a broken, odd, loner girl. Gee, thanks. I guess.

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